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Posts Tagged Wine

Batch converting audio files to MP3

If you’re converting a single file, http://media.io/ is a great online tool. However, for batch conversion, you’ll want to look at one or more of the following tools:

Windows:

dbPowerAmp is a great conversion utility http://www.dbpoweramp.com/dmc.htm

Ubuntu:

While dbPowerAmp says Linux is supported through Wine, I’ve found that soundconverter works wonderfully. To install it:

sudo apt-get install soundconverter

Next, just run it. You can select your input files and directories in the GUI. By default, soundconverter produces .ogg output. If you want mp3, simply select it in Edit > Preferences

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Guild Wars on PlayOnLinux

Here’s a quick run-down of the steps that I took when setting up Guild Wars on a friends Ubuntu machine under PlayOnLinux.

We chose PlayOnLinux because of the ability to use Wine prefixes, so we could customize the Guild Wars prefix for best play experience and no interfere with other configured Wine software. It also gave the easiest installation experience. We also chose PlayOnLinux as a free alternative to commercial programs like CrossOver Games.

Your experience may vary but this is what worked for us.

First, install PlayOnLinux either from Synaptic or the command line.

sudo apt-get install playonlinux

PlayOnLinux will be found under Applications > Games > PlayOnLinux (Gnome) or can be searched for in Unity.

Next, install Guild Wars

After starting PlayOnLinux, click the Install button, then click Games in the left column, and locate Guild Wars on the right side.  Click Apply. Follow the on-screen dialogs to complete the installation of Guild Wars.

Once Guild Wars is installed, it’s time to tune it for performance. Note that much of the following is subjective, and may not be needed under certain circumstances.

— Tune the Guild Wars wine configuration

Once Guild Wars is installed, locate it’s entry in PlayOnLinux and click it, then click Configure this application. The application configurator will open. Click Forward and choose Configure Wine, then Forward again to launch the Wine configuration utility.

Once the Wine configuration utility is open, click the audio tab. If you get a dialog message stating that the audio driver was auto-detected. That’s fine. Set the DirectSound Hardware Acceleration mode to Emulation. Next choose the Graphics tab and under Direct3D, uncheck Allow Pixel Shader.

— Force Guild Wars to start in windowed mode.

Guild Wars will inititally start in full-screen mode. If this causes the client to crash or causes strange graphics issues, you may force it to start in windowed mode using the following terminal command:

WINEPREFIX=~/.PlayOnLinux/wineprefix/GuildWars/ WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:GWGw.exe" -windowed

This will start Guild Wars in a window.

— Further registry tweaks

Locate the Guild Wars entry in PlayOnLinux and click it, then click Configure this application. The application configurator will open. Click Forward and choose Registry Editor, then Forward again to launch the Wine configuration utility.

Navigate the registry to

HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareWineDirect3D

(If the Direct3D key does not exist, right-click on Wine and choose New > Key and name it Direct3D)

Right-click and choose New > String value. Call it UseGLSL. Double-click on UseGLSL and set Value data to “disabled” without quotes.

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Gnome places menu items give ‘File not found’ error

This is one of several issues that I ended up helping a friend with last night on his Ubuntu installation. When clicking an item in the ‘Places’ menu, such as Pictures, Home, Music, etc, a dialog box appears that reads “Error: File not found”. We were scratching our heads until I realized that the error dialog looked suspiciously like it was being displayed using Wine.

After a bit of searching my suspicions were confirmed. This happens when, through one action or another, Wine is assigned the ‘Open Folder’ association. When you try to open a folder using the menu, Wine tries to open it and subsequently fails, and that’s where the error comes from.

Unfortunately I don’t have a screenshot but I do have a solution courtesy of Ubuntu Forums.

Open and edit the ~/.local/share/applications/mimeapps.list file. You can use this command:

gedit ~/.local/share/applications/mimeapps.list

Locate the line that starts with inode/directory= and change it to read as follows:

inode/directory=nautilus-folder-handler.desktop;

Save. Changes take effect immediately.

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Installing iTunes on Ubuntu Linux

If you have an iPod, and have installed Ubuntu Linux, you may have gotten used to manging your audio library with iTunes. When you go to reach for iTunes on Ubuntu, you may have a moment of panic when you realize there’s no Linux client. Don’t worry, there’s alternatives.

Linux-native applications

First, try a Linux-native application, such as Rhythmbox, banshee, or Amarok for music and tripod for photos. These apps all have some support for iPod devices, and can help you manage your already-existing music library. If you’re using iTunes for music downloads, you may find the music store section of Rhythmbox helpful.

iTunes in Wine via PlayOnLinux

Second, you can try installing iTunes 7 using PlayOnLinux. PlayOnLinux is an application that helps you install programs using wine and gives each program it’s own configuration environment. Programs are installed using configurations that usually give the best results, so there’s little if any manual configuration required after the fact.

Remember, wine is an interpretive layer between the Windows-native application and the Linux environment, and therefore there’s a good chance that iTunes will run slowly and some features may simply not work.

You can find PlayOnLinux in Software Center, Synaptic, or install it using the command line:

sudo apt-get install playonlinux

iTunes in Wine via manual install

Lastly, if none of the above options pan out for you, or you want to try the latest version, you can try installing iTunes manually using wine.

Start by making sure you have wine and ubuntu-restricted-extras installed. You can install these using Synaptic or the following command at the command line:

sudo apt-get install wine ubuntu-restricted-extras

With those installed, it’s time to get iTunes installed. WineHQ gives very mixed ratings for iTunes under wine, so your mileage may vary. In addition, you may find the WineHQ Forum on iTunes and wine helpful.

You can find older versions of iTunes at OldApps.com iTunes page.

Virtualization

Lastly, if you find you simply can’t live without iTunes in a Windows environment, you may try running a Windows virtual machine in a hypervisor like VMware (my personal favorite) or VirtualBox. I prefer VMware because it seems to have better hardware pass-through support than even the closed-source versions of VirtualBox

Have you been able to get iTunes running on Ubuntu? Have any experience or tips to share? Please do so in the comments below.

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