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Posts Tagged Toshiba

Toshiba L515-S4960 and Windows XP

Windows XP is not officially supported by Toshiba, and they offer very limited software downloads. This guide will attempt to give you the best installation instructions and driver download locations that apply to this model. Also, you may find the detailed spec sheet handy when looking for drivers.

Pre-Installation

Before installing Windows XP, go into the BIOS and change the SATA Operation mode to “Compatibility.” Read why here.

Installation

Insert your Windows XP disc. Immediately after powering on the system, tap F12 repeatedly to enter the boot device selection menu. Manually pick “boot from cd/dvd drive” and follow the on-screen directions.

Post-Installation (Drivers)

The following attempts to list the device IDs and driver download locations for Windows XP drivers. You may want to check your device IDs to verify same hardware.

Required Windows Components

The following Windows components are required for some drivers to successfully install:

Ethernet (10ec:8136) – Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller

WinXP, Win2K, Win2003 Auto Installation Program (SID:1453654) [link]

Wireless (Unknown Device ID) – Realtek RTL8187SE

Windows driver auto installation program [link] may or may not work.

This is the device that’s installed according to the spec sheet. However, several of these have the below Atheros chipset device.

Wireless (168c:001c) – Atheros Communications AR5BXB63 (AR5006X) /
WLL3141 (Toshiba PA3613U-1MPC) 802.11bg Wireless Adapter

Driver is here [link], but you will have to use the inf installation method, as there is no exe. Point to the netathwx.inf file in the download.

Video Controller (8086:2A43) and (8086:2A42) – Intel Graphics 4500M

Intel Graphics 4500M [link]

PCI data aquisition + signal processing controller (8086:2932) – 82801I (ICH9 Family) Thermal Subsystem

Seems to be satisfied by installing this driver [link] – Feedback is appreciated.

Sound (8086:293E) – Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) HD Audio Controller

Intel® HD Audio Controller – Realtek [link] (partially working – reportedly needs SMbus driver to work)

SM Bus controller (8086:2930) – 82801I (ICH9 Family) SMBus Controller

Satisfied by [linkNote: It seems after running this driver (even though it uninstalled the above Intel HD Audio driver) then running the Intel Driver Update Utility (below) appears to completely satisfy audio drivers.

Modem (11C1:1040) – Modem device on High Definition Audio Bus / Agere Systems HDA Modem

Toshiba Software Modem Driver for Windows XP [link] – But reportedly doesn’t satisfy this device. The Lenovo driver at [link] may work instead.

Audio device on High Definition Audio Bus (10EC:0268) – Realtek Audio

Windows 2000, Windows XP/2003(32/64 bits) Driver only (Executable file) [link]

Intel Driver Update Utility

Available at [link] – May detect some drivers but not all.

It appears that this Toshiba has hardware similar to the Dell Vostro V13 [link] and the Dell Studio 1555 [link]. You may be able to find some drivers to fill the missing pieces by checking the links above. Please let me know what works for you so that I can update information.

If you own or use this model Toshiba laptop and have different hardware, or have a link to a driver not listed above, or even an alternate driver download location, please feel free to leave a comment below. I will be updating this article as I find applicable drivers. If anything here has helped you, please let me know by leaving a kudos!

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How to get Vendor and Device IDs in Windows to find missing drivers

If you’re missing a driver in Windows, it can be extremely frustrating if the manufacturer doesn’t have one listed on their website. That leaves you to go find it yourself on the Internet.

The key to getting working drivers revolves not around matching them to the manufacturer, but matching them to the device IDs. Believe it or not, Dell drivers will run the same device on a Toshiba, on an HP, etc as long as the device IDs on the hardware match that on the driver. You can even go directly to the chipset manufacturer’s (Realtek, Atheros, Intel, etc) website to get drivers from them.

So how do you find the device IDs?

Go to Device manager, then find a device with a yellow exclamation mark (missing driver) and double-click it.

Go to the details tab. The drop-down should read “Device Instance ID”

Below it, read the ID and take the following bold bits from it:

pciven_10ec&dev_8136&subsys_ff661179&rev_024&38f101ee&0&00e0

In this case, the Vendor ID is 10EC and the Device ID is 8136. A common representation of this is the Vendor ID and the Device ID seperated by a colon or hyphen, such as 10EC:8136 or 10EC-8136. Running these through your favorite search engine should turn up drivers fairly quickly. If nothing else, it will help you find the full name of the device and help you find it on the chipset manufacturer’s website.

Another thing to note is the subsystem. That’s the part after the SUBSYS parameter. Windows shows it as 8 hex characters (in this case ff661179 but you can also find it represented as ff66:1179. This may be important in driver matching as well.

Be wary though — some sketchy download sites will trick you into giving away personal information (email address, cell phone number, etc) or ask that you install software (toolbar, driver installer) in order to download drivers from them. Avoid these scams!

Please feel free to comment!

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Correctly Recognize Alps Touchpad on Dell E6510 in Linux

Laptops which use newer Alps touchpad hardware may experience some lack of functionality as a result of a regression in the kernel psmouse driver — the touchpad is detected and works as a pointing device, but only functions with basic features. Scrolling, disabling tap-to-click, off when typing, and multi-touch (on supported devices) are some of the missing functionality. This appears to be the case with E5510, E6410, M6400, and other Dell (potentially all E2) and some non-Dell models.

From Simon Dierl:

Apparently, newer ALPS touchpads use a new, undocumented and unsupported protocol. The touchpad falls back to a legacy emulation mode, resulting in faulty detections. The kernel.org bug lists some efforts to reverse-engineer the protocol and has some patches based on DELL contributions that enable ImPS/2 emulation (scrolling works). This, however, still does not allow for synaptics support (turn off when typing, horizontal scroll, etc.). Additionally, some people report problems on suspend/resume. [sic]

The best way to notice if you have a machine which is affected by this bug, is to go to System > Preferences > Mouse and look for a Touchpad tab. If it’s absent, you are probably affected by this bug.

Another way to see if you are affected by this bug is to run lsinput and look for something like the following:

/dev/input/event9
bustype : BUS_I8042
vendor  : 0x2
product : 0x1
version : 0
name    : "PS/2 Generic Mouse"
phys    : "isa0060/serio1/input0"
bits ev : EV_SYN EV_KEY EV_REL

The above output shows the touchpad being identified and driven by the PS/2 driver.

This bug has been entered into Launchpad as bug #606238 and has its roots in Kernel bug #14660. Since it’s a mainline kernel bug, it’s likely to affect every Linux distribution. So far, it’s still a work-in-progress and there’s not been an accepted patch submitted to the Linux kernel team. There’s a discussion on ubuntuforums.org that this is a regression, and this was working in older kernel versions.

The below is based on a patch from cmg238 which, at the very least, causes the kernel to correctly recognize the device as a touchpad and enable some missing functionality. I have made adjustments to the instructions for clarity and explanation.

Download kernel source (to /usr/src):

sudo apt-get build-dep --no-install-recommends linux-image-$(uname -r)
apt-get source linux-image-$(uname -r)

(Note: in Ubuntu Precise 12.04, do the following instead, based on this LaunchPad comment)

sudo apt-get build-dep --no-install-recommends linux-image-$(uname -r)
sudo git clone git://github.com/bgamari/linux.git
cd linux
sudo git checkout origin/alps
sudo cp /boot/config-$(uname -r) .config

Also note that on Ubuntu Precise 12.04, you will be asked a bunch of additional questions at make-time. Accept the defaults, unless you have a reason to do otherwise.

Read about how to “undo” an apt-get build-dep and uninstall previously installed packages here.

Patch drivers/input/mouse/alps.c by locating alps_model_info and adding the additional line below, as follows:

static const struct alps_model_info alps_model_data[] = {
	{ { 0x73, 0x02, 0x64 }, 0xcf, 0xcf, ALPS_PASS | ALPS_DUALPOINT | ALPS_PS2_INTERLEAVED }, /* Dell Latitude E6510 */

Compile psmouse.ko module

cd src/drivers/input/mouse
make -C /lib/modules/`uname -r`/build M=`pwd` psmouse.ko

(On Ubuntu Precise 12.04, use the following instead:)

cd /usr/src/linux/drivers/input/mouse
make -C /lib/modules/`uname -r`/build M=`pwd` psmouse.ko

The following steps will cause you to lose mouse functionality until the modprobe psmouse statement. Be prepared. Also, You may want to backup your existing /lib/modules/(kernel version)/kernel/drivers/input/mouse/psmouse.ko before doing this!

rmmod psmouse
cp psmouse.ko /lib/modules/`uname -r`/kernel/drivers/input/mouse/
modprobe psmouse

The last thing to mention is if you update your kernel you will receive the distributed psmouse.ko module. If the kernel does not include a fix for this bug you will need to follow the directions in this post again to recompile the above patch back into the kernel.

Since this is a mainline kernel issue, I would ask that any reader who is able to, please visit the links within this post and contribute where ever you can to help in getting this resolved. You are welcome and encouraged to share your thoughts and feedback in the comments below as well.

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How hot is too hot? Don’t overheat your computer.

When your computer’s processor, chipset, or hard drive overheats, you can wind up with big problems. From system slowdowns to application crashes, video corruption, data loss, to permanent damage to your computer hardware. It’s important to keep your computer running cool.

Your computer has sensors in various places to monitor the internal temperature and regulate the fan speeds. These sensors are typically in places such as your CPU, graphics card, hard drive, and maybe one in open air (typically in desktops). Unlike your car, there’s no easy indicator of what the temperature is until things start to go wrong, and those fans can only do so much. Dust can clog heatsinks and air passages, which can slow down the flow of air and drive the chip temps up. If a fan fails completely, it will stop the airflow and the temperature will climb rapidly. For those reasons it helps to have a program to actually tell you what these temperature sensor readings are. If things are getting a little too hot, you might want to know so you can check things out.

For Windows, two good utilities are Speedfan (free) and Everest . For Ubuntu, two good programs can be found in Synaptic: sensors-applet and hddtemp.

Those programs will read the temp sensors and tell you the values. Unfortunately, these numbers won’t mean very much if you don’t know what the limits of your hardware are. For example, while typing this article on my laptop, my CPU temp is 35C (95F). While that might sound hot to some, the thermal design limit of my CPU is actually 105C (source: Intel). I know my processor is well within the design limits.

That said, here’s a list of a few common chipsets and their operating limits:

Various Intel Core 2 Duo (Desktops):

Models E6700 (2.66 GHz), E6600 (2.40 GHz), E6420 (2.13 GHz) and E6320 (1.86 GHz): 60.1 C (140 F).
Models E6400 (2.13 GHz), E6300 (1.86 GHz), E4400 (2 GHz) and E4300 (1.8 GHz): 61.4 C (143 F).
Models E6850 (3 GHz), E6750 (2.66 GHz), E6550 (2.33 GHz) and E6540 (2.33 GHz): 72 C (162 F).
Models E4500 (2.20 GHz) and E4400 (2 GHz): 73.3 C (164 F).
Source: Core 2 Duo Temperature Limit | eHow.com

Various laptops by manufacturer and chipset:

Dell Latitude D620 (using T7600 CPU): 100C
Dell Latitude D630 (using T7700 CPU): 100C
Toshiba Satellite A215-S7422
(using AMD Turion 64 X2): AMD Doesn’t say — See guidelines below

(I may add to this list as time goes on)

I’ve been seeing a lot of conversation about the nVidia Quaddro mobile chipset and it’s failure temp. While I haven’t been able to find anything official, I have been able to keep my chip under 80C and haven’t experienced a problem to date. See also: Disclaimer.

If you want to find the correct spec for a specific Intel product, you can use Intel’s ARK lookup.For AMD, try the AMD Product Specification lookup. For hard drives, check the manufacturers spec page for your specific drive.

However bear in mind when using these spec sheets that the given specs are for the components themselves under controlled conditions. Chipsets are likely to become unstable before reaching these temps, and heat run-off may damage nearby components on circuit boards. Additionally, occasional manufacturing defects can cause chip failures before these temperatures are reached. I would always suggest to try to stay at least 15-20C below the rated temperature.

If you can’t find specific temps for your chipset, good guidelines would be to try to stay below the following temps:

55C for desktop CPUs, 85C for laptop CPUs.
75C for desktop GPUs, 75C for laptop GPUs.
55C for desktop HDDs, 45C for laptop HDDs.

These are merely a reference point. While some chipsets may tolerate higher temps better than others, cooler is always better. See also: Disclaimer.

FAQ: Why are the rated chipset temps so much higher for laptops?

Laptops are by their very nature smaller and lighter than their desktop counterparts. In order to accommodate this, you will find laptops have smaller fans, heatsinks, and internal airways. Additionally, instead of fan-heatsink-chip assemblies, laptops often feature fan-heatpipe-chip assemblies, which locates the fan further from the chip. Mobile chipsets are thus designed to have higher operating temperatures because heat cannot always be dissipated quickly and occasionally the airways may become blocked. In addition, the higher operating temperatures allow the fans to cycle off to conserve battery power.

One last point worth mentioning is to make sure you’re using the latest OEM BIOS for your computer, especially for mobile machines. BIOSes often have a fan speed table in them which is what sets the fan speed based on the chipset temperature. You can typically find the BIOS update listed on the manufacturer’s website.

If you believe any of the information I have posted above is incorrect, or you would like to ask me to post data on a specific chipset, please leave a comment below. If you have any information to contribute, please do so in the comments. If you want to share this information, please do so as a link to this page for the sake of updates. Thank you.

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