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Posts Tagged Samba

Installing and configuring Samba on Raspberry Pi

If you want your Raspberry Pi to share its files and folders over the network, you want to install and configure Samba.

Start off by installing the basic Samba requirements:

sudo apt-get install samba samba-common-bin

Edit the samba config file

sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

edit the workgroup= line to match your network. workgroup=WORKGROUP is the default and usually fine. It needs to match what your Windows PCs are set to.

[pi]
path=/home/pi
browseable=Yes
writeable=Yes
only guest=no
create mask=0777
directory mask=0777
public=no

Add the pi user to samba. Use the same password for the pi user:

sudo smbpasswd -a pi

It takes about 2 minutes for the changes to take effect, but after this you should have no problem exploring files over the network. Note that some may be owned by root and you may have an issue writing to them.

If you have trouble logging in under Windows (password errors), try using “raspberrypi\pi” (raspberrypi-backslash-pi) as your username (without the quotes)

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How to add Samba accounts on openSUSE

Previously using Ubuntu, I never ran into this issue, but using openSUSE I couldn’t get logged into a Samba share using any user accounts. Turns out, the users have to be added to Samba seperately. Ubuntu probably did this through the adduser (useradd?) script. In openSUSE, you have to add the user manually.

You can either use pdbedit, or smbpasswd. Both work.

I won’t give examples here, as using –help for either program will spit out very useful and non-confusing examples. But, that’s how.

 

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openSUSE Dolphin brower gives error “Unable to find any workgroups in your local network. This might be cause by an enabled firewall.”

To solve this:

Open up YaST > Network Services > Samba Server.  Go to the “Identity” tab, and make sure the Workgroup is set correctly, and set Domain Controller to “Not a DC.”

 

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Installing Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS x64 on the HP MicroServer N40L

I’m mostly documenting this as a way for me to remember it, but anyone is free to learn from my doings or leave their own comments.

Configuration is 3x2TB hard drives in bays 0, 1, 2. Bay 3 is empty. (I’m considering adding a 4th 2TB drive and reshaping to RAID-6 at some point in the future.)

Partitioned as follows (MBR):

  1. 50GB as RAID
  2. 4GB as RAID
  3. 1.9TB (max) as RAID

RAID setup (mdadm) as follows:

  • md0: partition 1 (50GB) RAID-5, 3 units, 0 spares. EXT4, bootable, mounted at / [Total 100GB+parity]
  • md1: partition 2 (4GB) RAID-5, 3 units, 0 spares. swap [Total 8GB+parity]
  • md2: partition 3 (1.9TB) RAID-5, 3 units, 0 spares. EXT4, mounted at /srv [Total 3.8TB+parity]

Packages installed during installation:

  • OpenSSH
  • LAMP
  • Samba

GRUB installed to MBR

The very first thing to do after installation is to update. SSH in and run the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

May get the following complaint about kernel updates being held back:

The following packages have been kept back:
 linux-headers-generic-lts-quantal linux-image-generic-lts-quantal
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 2 not upgraded.

This is the fix:

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Coming up… more installations…

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Windows 8 error code 0x807800C5 during Windows 7 File Recovery backup

The following error appears if you try to include a system image in your backup using the Windows 7 File Recovery backup tool.

0x807800c5

There was a failure in preparing the backup image of one of the volumes in the backup set.

Details: The mounted backup volume is inaccessible. Please retry the operation.

Error code: 0x807800C5

According to this forum

For Win 8 only: The Win 7 back up program included with win 8 does not support backing up a image file to any kind of NAS device (UNIX, Linux) . Internally the program gives an error that the NAS device has an incompatible sector mapping type. You can backup to a hard drive that is attached to a different windows machine and then back up that file to your NAS. Convoluted, but it works.

So, backing up a system image to a Samba share is out of the question. To work around this, disable the creation of a system image in your backup.

I haven’t tried backing up to an NTFS-formatted iSCSI LUN, which might work. If anyone has tried that, I’d be interested to know the results.

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Error code 0x80070544 when attempting to back up Windows 8 onto NAS over Samba

If you use Windows 7 File Recovery to attempt to backup your system to a NAS device, you may receive the following error:

0x80070544: The specified network location cannot be used.

Verify the path points to a correct network location and that the supplied credentials can be used for write access to the folder.

The validation information class requested was invalid. (0x80070544).

The solution to this is rather simple. You have to prefix your username with the name of the machine where the Samba share is located. So, if you are backing up to diskstationbackups, prefix your username with diskstation.

In my case, my username on that device is mike. So instead of using mike as my username, I had to use diskstation\mike.

It works now. Enough said.

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Problems accessing Samba SMB shares on Mac OS X Snow Leopard

Problem:

In OS X Snow Leopard, you may experience problems accessing a SMB network share using either of the following methods:

Go > Network;

or, using Finder’s pane, under Shared;

.. and clicking ‘Connect As’ to log in.

You get the following error message:

You entered an invalid username or password. Please try again.

Workaround:

In Safari, type the following into the address bar:

smb://servername:139

Where servername is the server name of your SMB server.

Example:

smb://diskstation:139

a dialog box will appear, prompting you to log in. This should succeed and you will be prompted with a list of your devices shares. Selecting a share will mount it and display the contents.

Enjoy.

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CrashPlan backup to Samba share on Linux

For about a week now I’ve been wrestling with implementing a system where CrashPlan would backup to my network drive. I ran into a really bit problem: When you mount a network location in Gnome using the GUI (gvfs), root can’t access it. Since the CrashPlan engine runs at root, it makes the network location unusable as a backup destination.

After a while of working on different ways to solve this rather large hurdle, I came up with the idea of simply mounting the network location using smbmount (mount.cifs). After some testing and tweaking, I was able to get it successfully working and added an entry to fstab to have it mount at boot time. I chose /mnt/mynas as the mount point.

See Synology DiskStation and Samba mount permissions for my method of getting it mounted with the correct file permissions.

Once it was set to mount at boot-time, I can now open the CrashPlan client and set /mnt/mynas as a destination folder, and now I have both local and off-site backups!

Feel free to share your thoughts and/or feedback in the comments below!

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Synology DiskStation and Samba mount permissions

So today I was using smbmount to mount a network share from my Synology DiskStation to my Linux PC when I noticed a rather annoying file permissions issue that I couldn’t seem to fix. Why am I using smbmount and not Gnome’s GUI to mount? Because I need root to have access to the file system as well so that CrashPlan can back up to it.

Here’s what happened:

First, I mounted the share (as root):

smbmount //diskstation/mike /mnt/mynas -o credentials=/home/mike/mike.cred,uid=mike,gid=mike

(For more information on the smbmount or the mount.cifs credentials file, see the Ubuntu manpage for mount.cifs)

That worked great, except for when I do this (as root)…

ls -ld /mnt/mynas

… I get the following output:

drwxrwxrwx 17 mike mike 0 2011-05-20 09:25 mynas

I sure didn’t want the directory world-writable. So I tried specifying file_mode and dir_mode as both 0755 using the following (as root):

smbmount //diskstation/mike /mnt/mynas -o credentials=/home/mike/mike.cred,uid=mike,gid=mike,file_mode=0755,dir_mode=0755

Then I checked it:

ls -ld /mnt/mynas

… and got:

drwxrwxrwx 17 mike mike 0 2011-05-20 09:25 mynas

That didn’t do anything at all to help. Why? Because as it turns out the DiskStation is using a Samba server with CIFS extensions and is passing the permissions to smbmount (mount.cifs). The file_mode and dir_mode options are ignored if the remote server is using CIFS extensions.

file_mode=arg

If the server does not support the CIFS Unix extensions this overrides the default file mode.

dir_mode=arg

If the server does not support the CIFS Unix extensions this overrides the default mode for directories.

Source: Ubuntu manpages.

So there’s a couple of options here. First, I could set it to mount somewhere inside /home/mike, which would generally protect it. But I’d really like to know what’s up with the file permissions. So I did a little more Google-fu.

As it turns out, the CIFS extensions on the DiskStation can be disabled, all it takes is to edit a file. Lepoulpe posted on the Synology forums the following edit:

you can disable “unix extensions” in the ds106’s samba server. To achieve this, you need to add the folowing line in the [global] section of /usr/syno/etc/smb.conf :

unix extensions=no

So, I SSH’d into my DiskStation as root (should be the same password as ‘admin’ if you’re having trouble) and used the vi editor to make the edit. Afterwards, I restarted samba on the DiskStation by doing this:

/usr/syno/etc/rc.d/S80samba.sh restart

Then I remounted the Samba share as root…

smbmount //diskstation/mike /mnt/mynas -o credentials=/home/mike/mike.cred,uid=mike,gid=mike,file_mode=0750,dir_mode=0750

… and checked the permissions:

ls -ld /mnt/mynas

… and got the following output:

drwxr-x--- 17 mike mike 0 2011-05-20 09:25 mynas

Exactly right.

So now I have /mnt/mynas mounted to my share on the DiskStation. If I wanted it to mount on boot, I could add something like the following to /etc/fstab:

//diskstation/mike /mnt/mynas smbfs auto,credentials=/home/mike/mike.cred,uid=mike,gid=mike,dir_mode=0750,file_mode=0750,user 0 0

Questions about my method? Have any feedback or alternate methods to share? Please feel free to do so in the comments below. Thank you!

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Must-have Android apps?

I initially had my list of must-have Android apps posted in my review of my Samsung Moment, but I thought they deserved a mention apart from my awful experience with that phone.

I’ve recently updated this list to reflect my current list of must-have Android apps, rather than the old list. Quite a few of my recommendations have changed. These are recommendations for Froyo and newer. So here they are, in no particular order, and now with Market links. Note that some of these application descriptions have been taken directly from Market where I feel the author has explained it better than I could. If you have an iPhone, feel free to check out my list of must-have iPhone apps as well.

aCar
An all-in-one application to track and manage your car: maintenance, fill-ups, fuel mileage, expenses, business trips and more.

Advanced Task Killer (ATK)
Simple, easy-to-use task killer that supports automatically killing tasks as well as force-closing unwanted system tasks.

Astro File Manager
In my opinion the best free file manager / file explorer program available for Android. Easy manage files on your device and SD card. Easy to use, free, and powerful.

Autokiller Memory Optimizer
An outstanding and powerful automatic task killer with manual-kill features and additional tuning for rooted phones. Does have some advanced tuning features, so novice users may want to consider ATK above instead.

Barcode Scanner
A fun little app for using the camera to extract human-readable info from 1D and 2D barcodes. Supports many different barcode formats and recognizes codes quickly.

Barcode2file
The natural compliment to Barcode Scanner. Save your scans in a text file or send them via email with a simple touch. Supports batch scanning as well.

Battery Indicator
A free, simple, no-nonsense application to display your remaining battery as a percentage in your notification area.

Battery Widget
This widget displays the battery charge level as a percent on the home screen and offers one-touch access to the Wifi, GPS, and Bluetooth power toggles

Data Counter Widget
A must-have for those who are on data-limited plans. This widget displays your cell and wifi data usage for the month (or another configurable period of time) as a home screen widget.

Dolphin Browser HD
Puts the stock browser to shame. Easy full-screen browsing with swipe access to plugins and gesture  support for quick access to your favorite websites. Supports a variety of plugins as well.

Eternal Legacy HD
If you’re a fan of the turn-based fantasy RPG’s (think Final Fantasy) you will LOVE Eternal Legacy HD. This one is NOT available on Market, but is available from Gameloft.  Check the link for actual phone compatibility.

Evernote
This is one of those apps that once you have it you’re not sure ow you got along without it. Evernote is an easy-to-use, free app that helps you remember everything across all of the devices you use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. Evernote lets you take notes, capture photos, create to-do lists, record voice reminders–and makes these notes completely searchable, whether you are at home, at work, or on the go. Since Evernote’s notes are synced to all of your devices via the cloud, you don’t have to worry about losing them.

FBI Child ID
While the Android app is still in development as of  the date of this update, FBI Child ID is a must-have for anyone with a child that they are responsible for. You can store photos, identifying information, and have the comfort of having it with you whenever you have your phone. With the ability to send it to authorities with a few taps, FBI Child ID can save valuable time in the event of a lost or missing child. See the FBI’s official Child ID page for more information.

Facebook
What can I say? Facebook app. Much better with recent improvements.

Hackers Keyboard
I don’t like Swype — It lacks some of the extended characters that I use and I’m a tap-typer rather than a swipe-typer. When I do inadvertently swipe my finger across the keyboard it tends to mangle whatever I was trying to type. For me, Hackers Keyboard is better — and free!

JuiceDefender – Battery Saver
A freemium, easy-to-use application to monitor and extend the life of your phone or tablet. Features widgets that give you one-touch access to status and features.

JuicePlotter
Great app to show historical data about battery life and usage, as well as a widget to show time-to-charge and time-remaining on your battery life. Very useful, and gets more accurate over time.

LastPass
A great password manager. LastPass web site. With fast and easy access to your LastPass password vault, the LastPass mobile app is a must-have. (Note: Requires a LastPass premium subscription – $12/year)

Lookout Mobile Security
Contains an anti-virus element, phone location, and backup/restore services. Excellent service for free, and a quite reasonable paid subscription service.

Meebo IM
A multi-protocol instant messenger for Android. Supports AIM, Facebook, Google Talk, ICQ, Jabber, MSN, MySpace, and Yahoo messenger protocols.

Parcels
Track FedEx, UPS, USPS, DHL and more right from your handheld. Also allows you to scan barcodes before shipping to be informed on their progress to the recipient.

PayPal
Handy for sending money via PayPal while on the go.

Spare Parts Plus
This is a handy utility for editing some hidden functions of your phone or tablet device. Settings should be changed carefully. The most useful reason for this app is enabling/disabling compatibility mode.

Twitter
It’s Twitter. Do I need to say any more?

Waze
Waze uses your devices GPS to not only provide turn-by-turn navigation, but also provides crowd-sourced traffic data to other Waze users  about traffic, delays, police presence, accidents, and other road incidents. Waze allows you to report a road incident with just a few taps on the screen, and Waze works well in both portrait and landscape orientation. (Thanks Jeff T. for the recommendation!)

WeatherBug Elite
Shows up-to-date weather information, forecast, radar (supports multi-touch), and more, with configurable widgets and “follow me” support. WeatherBug Elite is nice, but they do have the free WeatherBug app available too.

WordPress
A real must-have for anyone with a WordPress.com or self-hosted WordPress blog.

Z-DeviceTest
Handy app for testing various functions and sensors on your phone.

If you’ve read this far, you might also be interested in a list of apps specifically for rooted phones, yes? Well, here they are:

AdAway
Open-source ad blocker for rooted phones.

AdFree Android
Another ad blocker for root phones. For more information and to give feedback, visit the XDA Forums.

Chainfire3D
An intermediary OpenGL graphics driver which may increase video performance on some devices. Requires: Root, 1ghz+ device, Android 2.1+. See the XDA thread for more information and a list of compatible devices.

Samba Filesharing
A Samba server for your Android phone. Allows you to access your Android phone’s SD card over your network.

Titanium Backup
EXTREMELY powerful tool. Backup ALL apps, Market links, remove bloatware & MORE! Backs up your apps to your SD card and can restore them with their data even after a hard reset, factory reset, or even a new ROM install. It’s fantastic!

Have an Android app you just can’t live without? Please let me know in the comments below!

Last update: December 7th, 2011

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