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Posts Tagged DSM

How to move the SymformContribution directory from one volume to another on a Synology NAS

So you’ve got Symform all set up and running on your Synology NAS, and you’ve been contributing space, but now the volume that has your contribution folder is getting full, adn you’d like to move it without disrupting the data that other Symform users like yourself have trusted you with. How to do it? Easily.

In this example, I’ll show you how to move it from volume1 to volume2.

First, stop the Symform service from Package Center.

symform_stopped

Next, SSH into your Synology box and move the target directory to it’s new location, in this case, /volume2/SymformContribution

mv /volume1/SymformContribution/ /volume2

Next, edit the /volume1/@symform/lib/node.config file using vi and update the location by finding the line similiar to the following…

<contribution enabled="True" fragmentStorePath="/volume1/SymformContribution" port="53432" />

… and changing volume1 to volume2.

(Note, this is the same file that’s used to update the incoming port, see this post for more information.)

Save the file, and restart the Symform service.

symform_running

That’s it!

Questions or comments are welcome in the comments section below. Thank you for reading!

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Controlling fan speed and hard drive APM settings on Synology DiskStation

There is a file in /usr/syno/etc/scemd.xml which controls the fan speeds and trigger temperatures corresponding to the setting at Control Panel > Power, as well as drive APM settings (for hard drive head parking issues. More information for this issue can be found by reading this post). Feel free to edit the file to your needs, but remember that settings may not be preserved during DSM updates.

On my DS211j running DSM 4.1-2668 the file contains the following:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<scemd>
 <fan_config period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_HIGH" hibernation_speed="STOP">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="ULTRA_LOW" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="VERY_LOW" action="NONE">52</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="LOW" action="NONE">54</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="ULTRA_HIGH" action="NONE">58</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
 </fan_config>
 <fan_config period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_LOW" hibernation_speed="STOP">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="STOP" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="ULTRA_LOW" action="NONE">40</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="VERY_LOW" action="NONE">52</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="LOW" action="NONE">54</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="ULTRA_HIGH" action="NONE">58</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
 </fan_config>

<fan_config hw_version="Synology-DX5" period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_HIGH_EBOX" hibernation_speed="UNKNOWN">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">45</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">55</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
</fan_config>

<fan_config hw_version="Synology-DX5" period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_LOW_EBOX" hibernation_speed="UNKNOWN">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">45</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="NONE">55</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
</fan_config>

<fan_config hw_version="Synology-DX510" period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_HIGH_EBOX" hibernation_speed="LOW">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="MIDDLE" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="HIGH" action="NONE">48</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
</fan_config>

<fan_config hw_version="Synology-DX510" period="20" threshold="6" type="DUAL_MODE_LOW_EBOX" hibernation_speed="LOW">
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="MIDDLE" action="NONE">0</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="HIGH" action="NONE">48</disk_temperature>
 <disk_temperature fan_speed="FULL" action="SHUTDOWN">61</disk_temperature>
</fan_config>
<disk_control>
 <disk model="ST9120821A">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="HTS722020K9SA00">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="ST980811AS">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="MHV2060BH">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="MK6034GSX">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="ST9100824AS">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="HM250JI">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="MK1637GSX">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="ST9100824AS">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="ST9120822AS">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="ST9160821AS">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="WD2500BEVS-75UST0">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="HM250JI">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="WD2500BEVS">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="WD1600BEVT">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="HTS543232L9A300">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="WD1600BEVE">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="MK2546GSX">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="MHV2080BHPL">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="WD1200BEVE">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="HTS543225L9A300">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="WD3200BEVT">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="MK8025GAS">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="ST9200420AS">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="WD3200BEVT">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="HTS543216L9SA00">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="MK4058GSX">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="WD6400BEVT">APM_254</disk>
 <disk model="ST32000542AS">APM_255</disk>
 <disk model="ST95005620AS">APM_255</disk>
</disk_control>

</scemd>

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Getting rid of the @eaDir folders on Synology NAS DSM

The @eaDir directories contain extended attributes and thumbnails that take up quite a bit of space, not unlike Windows Thumbs.db files.

Here’s how to get rid of them easily from the command line.

First, SSH into your Synology NAS box and log in as root, then type this to locate the @eaDir folders:

find . -name "@eaDir" -type d | more

If you’re happy you’re not going to accidentally delete something important, then make it happen:

find . -name "@eaDir" -type d -print0 | xargs -0 rm -rf

Note that after deleting the directories, you may also want to disable the services that created them.

Do you have any feedback on the above? Please leave it in the comments section below. Thank you!

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Disable indexing and generation of @eaDir directories on Synology NAS

Various forums throughout the Internet have users stating that even though they’ve disabled media indexing the @eaDir folders are still being generated, and even outside the indexed folders.

In order to completely stop the generation of @eaDir folders, it’s necessary to disable the services that are generating them.

Note that after a DSM update, these services may be re-enabled.

To disable these services, log in to your Synology NAS via SSH, then do the following:

cd /usr/syno/etc.defaults/rc.d/
chmod 000 S66fileindexd.sh S66synoindexd.sh S77synomkthumbd.sh S88synomkflvd.sh S99iTunes.sh

After disabling the services, you may want to delete all the created @eaDir directories.

Any feedback on the above is welcome, please leave it in the comments section below. Thank you!

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