Posts Tagged Chrome

StartSSL SSL Certificate on Synology NAS using subdomain

This will explain how to generate and install SSL certificates on your Synology NAS to get rid of the pesky SSL certificate errors. I’ll be explaining specifically how to generate and install from StartSSL, who gives out free SSL certificates.

First, you will need to own or control a domain name, and have a subdomain set up and CNAME pointed to your Synology NAS’s IP address. You can find a walkthrough on how to set that up by reading this article. If you are having trouble with certificate domain mismatches, make sure you have read this article first: Synology DiskStation on a subdomain with dynamic IP address.

Once that’s set up, head over to StartSSL and follow the steps outlined below to validate a domain name and generate an SSL certificate.

Validate a domain name

Select the Validations Wizard and choose type Domain Name Validation

select_domain_validation

Enter the domain name you wish to validate, and continue. You are validating only the base domain name.

domain-name-validation

Select an email address to which the validation code will be mailed to, and then continue.

select-verification-email

Enter the validation code you received via email, and continue.

complete-validation-code

Generating your SSL certificate

After verifying your domain ownership, you can now generate the SSL certificate.

Select Certificates Wizard and choose Web Server SSL/TLS certificate, as in the image below.

web-server-ssl-cert

Generate a private key by inputting a password of at least 10 characters, choosing your key length, and selecting SHA1.

On the next screen, you will be given your generated, encrypted, private key with instructions to save it to a file called ssl.key, and what to do with it. For now, just create a new text file on your desktop, call it “encrypted_ssl_key” (or whatever), and hang on to it for later. I’ll explain what to do with it in a few more steps.

save-private-key

Next, you’ll be prompted to add a verified domain to your SSL cert. Choose the previously validated base domain.

add-domains

Next, you’ll be prompted to enter a subdomain to add to the certificate. This is where you enter your NAS’s subdomain. For example, if your root domain is example.com, and your NAS is accessible via myds.example.com, enter myds.

The ready processing certificate screen will show next, and should include both your base domain name and the subdomain, like this following image.

ready-processing

The following screen will appear, and prompt you to save the certificate, as well as the intermediate certificates, which you will need for the Synology NAS. Save the certificate in a file called ssl.crt as instructed. Hold on to both it, and the two downloaded intermediate certificates for the following steps.

save-cert

Decrypt the private key

One more step before we install the certs onto the NAS box. Head over to the StartSSL toolbox and click on Decrypt Private Key.

decrypt-private-key

In the top box, paste the saved encrypted private key that you generated and named “encrypted_ssl_key” (or whatever). In the Passphrase box, enter the 10-character-or-so password that you set on it, and click decrypt. Save the decrypted key to a file called ssl.key.

Installing the SSL certs

Now we’re ready to install the SSL certs onto the Synology NAS. Log in as admin and head to Control Panel > Web Services. Click the HTTP Service tab and click Import Certificate.

For each of the following select the corresponding files

Private Key: Your decrypted ssl.key file

Certificate: Your ssl.crt file

Intermediate certificate: The sub.class1.server.ca.pem intermediate certificate you downloaded.

(If you forgot to download the intermediate certificates, you can get them again by following this link.)

Click ok, and you should see Restarting Web Server, like so

syno-import-cert

Assuming all went well, you should be able to go to the subdomain and see a good SSL certificate lock icon, like so in Chrome

identity-verified

Questions, comments, or otherwise, please feel free to share them in the comments below. Thank you!

Advertisements

, , , ,

34 Comments

Migrating password data from LastPass to 1Password

This explains a fairly simple way to migrate your LastPass data to 1Password using Windows.

First, open your LastPass vault by going to https://lastpass.com and logging in.

Next, under the Actions column on the left, click Export.

For the next part, you’ll have to save the decrypted data to a CSV file. I was using Chrome when I did this, but I’m certain the instructions for any other browser aren’t too much more difficult.

When your decrypted LastPass vault data appears, click the wrench icon and choose ‘Save Page As…

In the file prompt that appears, name the file something you can remember and give it an extension of .CSV. For example, lastpass.csv

NOTE: Your exported CSV contains ALL your LastPass vault data in PLAIN TEXT.

Now, open 1Password and import your LastPass data as follows:

From within 1Password, select File > Import and select the CSV file you just exported from LastPass.

On the Select Columns screen, map the fields as follows:

  • Title -> name
  • username -> username
  • password -> password
  • location -> url
  • description -> extra

Click OK, then click “Yes to all” on the next screen.

After a few moments your password data should be loaded into 1Password.

Note: Your LastPass secure notes will import with ‘sn’ in the location field.

, , ,

2 Comments

Enable or disable individual browser plugins in Chrome or Chromium

I needed this tonight when doing failover testing on a page I’m putting together. You can enable/disable browser plugins in Chrome / Chromium by typing the following into the browser’s address bar:

about:plugins

The page that opens will allow easy enabling / disabling of plugins.

Leave a comment

Example of a fake antivirus web page with screenshots

So I was browsing for something today via google Images and I happened upon a malicious web page.

The web page tried to convince me to install an “Anti-Virus” program, on the premise that “Chrome Security” had found viruses on my computer.

Back in 2010, Google themselves issued a warning about these very same “fake antivirus” attacks:

“Constant improvements are being made on the fake anti-virus software with sophisticated tactics designed to trick the computer users in downloading and installing the software which is meant to create malicious code in your computer.” — Source: techgenie.com

Take a careful look at the below screenshots I captured and see firsthand how an attack like this works. The key here is that the website detects your browser and displays a message that matches the browser to make it more believable.

Click for larger image

The website first gives you a simple dialog. Clicking OK here begins the following series of screens. The safest thing to do once you get a dialog like this is to click the X and then close the window. Notice that the dialog message contains a vital “tell”: the website is displaying the message, not your browser.

Click for larger image

Click for larger image

This screen shows the fake “scan”, which is likely just a flash video (I didn’t actually check). The safest thing here is to close the tab/window immediately.

Click for larger image

Click for larger image

The “result” screen. Notice that it’s tried to download an .exe file, no doubt the fake antivirus software itself. The fake antivirus software would actually be the trojan — the web page itself is mostly harmless, minus the persuasion to install the payload. The safest thing here to is to close the tab/window immediately.

So in this case I can report the site to Google by clicking wrench icon > Tools > Report an issue.

The take-away lessons from this are:

  • Your browser doesn’t have any tools within it to detect viruses
  • Any notice about viruses should display as being from your antivirus program, not your web browser
  • Close web page prompts and pop-ups using the X rather than hitting any OK or other buttons

Also, I’m running Linux, and therefore none of the above “viruses” could have actually been detected, not to mention the exe couldn’t have done anything to me. :)

,

Leave a comment

How to export your Firefox bookmarks to Google Chrome

Having been frustrated by some of the recent regressions in Firefox 4, particularly those involving Flash graphs, I’ve picked up Chrome and so far couldn’t be happier.

Moving my bookmarks over wasn’t too hard either. Here’s how to do it.

In Firefox 4, click Bookmarks > Show All Bookmarks (or press Ctrl-Shift-O)

Then choose Import and Backup > Export HTML…

Save that file somewhere you can find it for the next step.

Now, in Chrome, open the Bookmark Manager. You can find it by clicking the wrench icon, then Bookmark Manager.

Now choose Organize > Import Bookmarks from the Bookmark Manager and import that HTML file you just exported from Firefox.

Readers may also want to consider trying the free service Xmarks, which features automatic bookmark syncing across multiple browsers using a plug-in. Supports Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, and Safari (Mac OS).

This was done using Firefox 4.0.1 and Chromium Browser 10.0.648.205 (81283) on Ubuntu 11.04. Questions, comments, and feedback are welcome and appreciated!

, , , ,

6 Comments