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Posts Tagged Backup

Windows 8 error code 0x807800C5 during Windows 7 File Recovery backup

The following error appears if you try to include a system image in your backup using the Windows 7 File Recovery backup tool.

0x807800c5

There was a failure in preparing the backup image of one of the volumes in the backup set.

Details: The mounted backup volume is inaccessible. Please retry the operation.

Error code: 0x807800C5

According to this forum

For Win 8 only: The Win 7 back up program included with win 8 does not support backing up a image file to any kind of NAS device (UNIX, Linux) . Internally the program gives an error that the NAS device has an incompatible sector mapping type. You can backup to a hard drive that is attached to a different windows machine and then back up that file to your NAS. Convoluted, but it works.

So, backing up a system image to a Samba share is out of the question. To work around this, disable the creation of a system image in your backup.

I haven’t tried backing up to an NTFS-formatted iSCSI LUN, which might work. If anyone has tried that, I’d be interested to know the results.

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Error code 0x80070544 when attempting to back up Windows 8 onto NAS over Samba

If you use Windows 7 File Recovery to attempt to backup your system to a NAS device, you may receive the following error:

0x80070544: The specified network location cannot be used.

Verify the path points to a correct network location and that the supplied credentials can be used for write access to the folder.

The validation information class requested was invalid. (0x80070544).

The solution to this is rather simple. You have to prefix your username with the name of the machine where the Samba share is located. So, if you are backing up to diskstationbackups, prefix your username with diskstation.

In my case, my username on that device is mike. So instead of using mike as my username, I had to use diskstation\mike.

It works now. Enough said.

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How to manually change the Symform contribution port on a Synology NAS

Symform is a cloud-based backup solution which allows you to have 10 GB of backup space free, and get additional free space, as well as support, by contributing space.

In order to contribute, you need to have a port forwarded to your Synology device. However, in my experience, I wasn’t able to choose the port (as it’s chosen randomly during installation). If the port number that the Symform service chooses is already taken, or you prefer to assign another port number, here’s how to do it.

To do this, you will already need to know how to set up port forwarding on your router, and install and set up the Symform service on your Synology NAS, as well as be familiar with how to SSH into your Synology NAS. This only shows you how to manually edit the contribution port number chosen by the Symform service.

Make sure the Symform service is stopped

Do this by logging into your Synology on the admin port (usually 5000 or 5001) and going to Package Center. Under Installed, you can stop the Symform service by clicking the stop button. Once the service is stopped (as shown below), you can continue.

symform_stopped

SSH into your Synology NAS

If you haven’t already, turn on the SSH (or telnet) service by going to Control Panel > Terminal, and enabling the desired service. Next, SSH (or telnet) into your Synology NAS box. Once logged in, go to the Symform configuration directory by typing:

cd /volume1/@symform/lib

Next, open node.config with the vi editor:

vi node.config

Locate a line starting with <contribution enabled="True" fragmentStorePath= and scroll to the right of that line, and you will see port="43100" (or another port number). If you’re not familiar with the vi editor, carefully follow the following commands to edit the file in-place:

  • Press the a key to enter append (editor) mode
  • Cursor to the value and use the keyboard to edit it
  • Press the ESC key to exit editing mode
  • Type :w followed by enter to save the file
  • Type :q followed by enter to quit the editor

Now go back to Package Center and start the Symform service.

You will be able to see the updated port number in your Symform control panel.

If you have any questions, comments, or thoughts to share, please do so in the comments below. Thank you!

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I put down my Android and picked up an iPhone… here’s what I noticed

I’ve been getting more than a few expressions of “You? Got an iPhone?” from friends and family lately, after they see my iPhone 4S. While I’ve been known not to be the biggest fan of Apple up until now, I’m starting to realize why the device has gotten to be so popular — it’s an easy-to-use, reliable device that doesn’t frustrate.

Although learning a new smartphone OS hasn’t been terribly difficult, here’s some of the major points between the two that I’ve found myself having to adjust to.

The Home Screen

The home screen on an Android phone is more-or-less a “blank slate”, waiting for you to fill it to your liking with widgets and shortcuts, to make it just the way you want it. If you want to access all your installed apps you open what’s typically referred to as the “app drawer.”

On an iPhone, that “app drawer” is your home screen. No widgets here, though apps do have what’s called “badges” that can show an indicator on the icon if the app has something that wants your attention, such as a number of missed calls over the phone icon, unread texts over the messages icon, and so on.

Removable Storage

Android-based phones feature a microSD card slot for removable storage. It’s an optional — but highly recommended — additional storage space that you can use for media, and on some versions of Android, even apps. You can upgrade this by simply popping out the card, copying the contents to a new, presumably larger card, and putting that card in your phone.

On an iPhone on the other hand, what you buy is what you get — buy a 16GB iPhone, get a gross total of 16GB. Likewise for the other sizes, such as 32GB.

However, there’s some distinct differences:

Android phones by default have their apps installed on the phone’s lower-capacity internal memory. Since the internal memory is smaller than the microSD card, (Sprint’s Epic 4G for example, only has 1GB internal memory), you are sharply limited for the space your apps have to share with everything else. Starting with Android version 2.2 (Froyo) and up you had the ability to move apps to the SD card. This frees up internal memory. However, its up to the app developer to support this feature, and if they did, most apps still required that you move it yourself from within the phone’s settings. Remember those widgets? Don’t plan on them working if you move your app to the SD card.

iPhones on the other hand have a single unified storage area for everything. Assuming you get a 16GB iPhone, that storage space is used for everything — there’s no need to move anything. Apps, media, and the OS all share a single storage space. You might say “this is less overall than an Android phone”, and you would be right. But — you aren’t going to have to try to balance what apps are stored on SD card versus the phone’s internal memory.

When you plug your Android-based smartphone into your computer’s USB port, you’ll likely get a message asking if you want to charge-only, or mount as removable storage. If you select to mount as removable storage you have full access to the SD card in the phone. This is handy if you want to use your phone’s memory card as a makeshift USB flash drive. However, once you mount it to the PC, you don’t have access to it from the phone. Apps that are installed on the SD card cannot be run, and you won’t have access to any media on the card until you unmount it from the PC.

Media

Installing media on an Android phone isn’t difficult. Simply mount the phone to your PC as USB storage (or insert the microSD card into your computer), and copy music, pictures, or anything else you like to it. When you unmount (or insert the card back into the phone) the media scanner will automatically detect your media and propagate the media libraries. But — it’s up to you to get your own music.

With an iPhone and a Windows or Mac computer running iTunes you simply connect your phone to your PC, select what media — such as music, movies, or other — you want to sync, and iTunes adds it to your device. You can purchase your music through iTunes as well. However, you have to use iTunes. Don’t expect your iPhone and Linux-based PC to get along very well.

Backup and Restore

With an iPhone, completely backing up your device is as quick and easy as plugging it into iTunes and right-clicking on it and choosing “Backup.” iTunes takes care of it, and makes restoring it just as painless.

With an stock Android, you don’t have any options to make a “full” backup. You can sync your contacts, calendar, etc to your Google (or other) account, and there they will sit in case you need them. In case of a serious issue, you can boot your phone to recovery mode and wipe it from there, restoring it to stock configuration, after which, prepare to spend some time reinstalling and reconfiguring your apps and account. Rooted users have a few additional options, such as ClockworkMod’s Nandroid backup and restore, and the third party app Titanium Backup.

There’s a lot more differences between the two that I didn’t cover above. But I will say this: When people ask me why I got an iPhone, my typical response is something along the lines of “it’s easy to use without having to think about.” I really enjoy my iPhone, and I don’t think I’ll be picking up an Android phone again anytime soon.

What about you, reader? What are you experiences with Android and iPhones? Do you have anything to share or compare that I didn’t cover in the above? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below!

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How to find a keyword in your WordPress posts using SQL

If you have a lot of WordPress posts and might want to find all posts containing a certain keyword for any reason, you can start by using the following SQL code, which was taken from this post. I used this in phpMyAdmin for a MySQL database. Make sure you are in the correct database first!

You can substitute any keyword for ‘needle’ below, but you must have the single-quotes and percent signs around it.

SELECT ID FROM wp_posts WHERE post_content LIKE '%needle%';

Example: Let’s say you use the NG Gallery plugin, which has you add a tag to all your posts to include said gallery. Now you find to find all posts which have that NG Gallery tag in them. The following query would work:

SELECT ID FROM wp_posts WHERE post_content LIKE '%nggallery%';

This can also be built upon for find-and-replace operations.

Keep in mind, you can really muck things up using SQL. Make a backup first if you don’t know what you’re doing!

Questions, comments, and feedback are always welcome. Thanks!

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Basic Ubuntu VPS server backup via FTP or SSH SFTP

In my quest for the perfect “in my dreams” backup solution for my Ubuntu VPS, I created this very simple script which can be run as a cron job and can be easily modified to backup any amount of data to any remote FTP or SFTP server.

You could very easily include a database backup by running mysqldump beforehand, but I’m not including it in this script.

This required yafc to be installed, but Ubuntu installations can easily install it by running

sudo apt-get install yafc

And now, for the script:

#!/bin/bash
# format of the open command is proto://username:password@HOSTorIP/
# proto is either ftp or ssh
# special characters in the username or password are not well tolerated
# anything in the EOF tags are direct commands to yafc. Test if unsure
DIR=`date +%F`
yafc <<EOF
open ftp://username:password@ftp.example.com/
cd backup-dir
mkdir $DIR
cd $DIR
put -p -r *
close
exit
EOF

Enjoy! Questions, comments, and feedback are welcome and appreciated. Thank you!

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How to import Android phone contacts to Gmail contacts

If you set up your Google account using your Android phone, or you added contacts to your phone but didn’t set them as Google account contacts, you will find they’re not synced to your Google account. This means that they’re not available as contacts when composing messages, and worse, you’re not using your Google account as a backup in case your phone is lost or damaged, or you swap phones.

You can easily fix this by doing the following steps from your Android phone:

  • Open Contacts
  • Hit menu > Import/Export
  • Export to SD card, then hit OK to confirm.

After a few moments, your data will be exported.

Next, we delete all contacts, to prevent confusion

  • In Contacts, hit menu > delete > Select All > delete

If you don’t have this option, try Delete All Contacts from Android Market.

(If you’re concerned about deleting your contacts before re-importing them, you can always import them, then resolve the duplicates manually, but you will have stale contacts in your phone. Deleting your contacts then re-importing them a second time will take care of that.)

Lastly, re-import all the contacts to your Google account

  • Hit Import/Export again
  • Select Import from SD Card
  • Select Save contact to… (your Google account) NOT phone

After a few moments, your data will be re-imported, and synced with your Google account online. Note that it may take up to a few minutes for the contacts to start appearing in your Google account.

If you mistakenly import multiple times, you may end up with duplicates in your online Google account. To fix this, simply open more > Find and Merge duplicates from your Contact manager as shown below:

Yes, I really do have 329 contacts.

Note: It is not possible to preserve group information during an export/import. It’s not supported by Google.

Questions and comments are welcome below, thank you!

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Cleaning up after PhotoRec – Linux Edition

A friend of mine accidentally formatted her 2TB backup drive and brought it to me to see what I could do. PhotoRec was the only tool that would give more than a hint of recoverable data from my Linux-based laptop. After letting it run for several hours, I had a mess: PhotoRec recovered over 230,000 files,  and spread them out over 430 directories!

Finding and sorting them by hand was obviously out of the question as it would take way too long. I took a hint from another recovery program I had [unsuccessfully] tried, and thought of sorting them into directories based on their file extensions. I.e. .jpg into ‘jpg’, .doc into ‘doc’, etc.

However, since I was working with the large number of files and directories, I had to take this a bit further. This will sort files into directory names like ‘jpg.1’, ‘jpg.2’, etc. These are numbered to prevent putting too many files in a single directory and killing system performance :)

I came up with the following bash script for use on Linux systems. A word of caution is due: This script does very little error checking, though the commands are quite sensible and I ran it as-is with fine results. I’m not responsible for unanticipated results.

UPDATE: This has moved to github, here.

Questions, comments, and feedback are welcome. Please leave them in the comments section below. Thank you!

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Easy Sprint Galaxy Tab 7 Rooting

There’s a very easy method for rooting the Sprint Galaxy Tab 7″. I don’t know whether it works on the 10.1 or not, as I only have the 7″.

REQUIRES:
* A decent Windows computer (XP or newer) – Virtual machine alone will not work
* Your Tab USB cable
* About 15 minutes or so
* Ability to follow instructions

NOTE: Build number will NOT show “QUENS.GINGERBREAD.EF17” per the screenshot, it will show “GINGERBREAD.EF17”. Verify success by the presence of ‘Superuser’ in applications and try downloading Titanium Backup (or any other root-required application, such as Root Checker) from Market and verify you get a prompt for Superuser access.

Runs smoothly with no issues.

Link: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1161033

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Is the digital age threatening the history of our society?

The culture shift of paper books to e-books is just the tip of the iceberg. It’s not just books, but our entire collective record-keeping mentality. So why do I say our society’s history may be in danger?

Back up, back up, back up

Odds are you’re reading this on a personal computer. Take a moment to stop and think about the last time you had a hard drive crash, your OS got corrupted, or something else happened to cause you to lose your data.

Think of the last time you went somewhere or called somewhere only to get “Our systems are down and we can’t help you right now, try again tomorrow.”

Now think of that taken to a much larger scale. What would happen if, by some epic disaster (we’ve had a few of those recently, right?) data centers and/or infrastructure were destroyed. Those places that safeguard finances, medical records, whatever digital data you can think of. Gone in moments.

In 2007, Google built two new data centers at a cost of $600 million. That’s $300 million a piece for strictly capital investment (construction, infrastructure, computers, etc.). In that same year Microsoft spent $500 million to build a 550,000 square foot data center in Northlake, IL.

This is money spent simply on physical structure alone, no doubt to disaster-proof the buildings and the technology. However, there’s a mathematical certainty — disaster will happen, it’s simply a matter of when.

The Next Generation

Books — more specifically the printed word — is the prime record-keeping system of a society. Books tell stories and document fact and theory, and that’s how information is passed down to the next generation. But what happens when that system gets replaced by a fragile digital system?

What happens when the inevitable does occur? Who will have records of our generation 50 years from now? 100 years from now? Do you think a few dozen hard drives sitting in a data center, which get found a dozen years or so after some completely unplanned-for calamity are really going to be able to pass along any information about us?

In 1999, archaeologists discovered a stone tablet that dated to 900 BC, making it just over 2900 years old now. A few weeks ago, a friend brought me her laptop that wouldn’t boot up. It had a bad hard drive. Her daughter’s birthday pictures were on there. No backups. They’re gone forever now.

Am I on to something here, or simply being hyper-paranoid? Your thoughts?

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