Archive for May 5th, 2011

Synology DiskStation on a subdomain with dynamic IP address

If you have a Synology DiskStation and already have a hostname (for your website, blog, or other) you can set up your DiskStation on a dedicated subdomain easily — even if you have a dedicated IP address.

First, determine what subdomain you’re going to assign to your device, based on the domain name you already have. For example, you might own example.com and want ds.example.com to point to your DiskStation. That’s perfectly fine — it’s your choice.

Next, get yourself a free dynamic IP hostname at a service like DynDNS. They provide Dynamic DNS hosts for free, and it only takes a few minutes to sign up. It doesn’t matter what domain you pick, but you only get one. For the purpose of this guide, I’ll say that I signed up for example.dyndns.orgIf you are using the Synology Dynamic DNS service, you have this already. Continue.

Once you’re signed up and activated your domain, you need to set up automatic updating. You can do this through the DiskStation itself under Control Panel > DDNS, or with a router that supports Dynamic IP updating (most routers).

ds_ddns2

Now your client will keep your hostname up to date automatically, even if your IP address changes.

The next step is to assign your new DynDNS hostname to a DNS CNAME record. You want to add a CNAME record for ds.example.com that points to example.dyndns.org. Specific instructions will vary by your DNS registrar, so consult them if you’re not sure exactly how to add the record. Keep in mind it may take up to 24+ hours for the DNS record to propagate, so if it doesn’t work right away, try again later.

Once the DNS zone has propagated, you should be able to access your DiskStation at your new hostname ds.example.com, and the DynDNS client will keep your hostname updated.

If you want to create an SSL cert for HTTPS access, create it for ds.example.com using the instructions found here: https://mikebeach.org/2012/11/13/startssl-ssl-certificate-on-synology-nas-using-subdomain

Questions, comments, and feedback about this are welcome.

,

Leave a comment

Michaels Customer Security Alert

Received via email:

Dear Michaels Customer:

Michaels has just learned that it may have been a victim of PIN pad tampering in the Chicago area and that customer credit and debit card information may have been compromised.

In the event that this is a more widespread issue, we are taking the precautionary measure of alerting all of our customers so that they may protect themselves.  We recommend immediately contacting your bank and/or credit card company to check for and report any unauthorized charges, as well as seek their advice on how to protect your account in the event that your information has been taken.  Additional information is available on the Federal Trade Commission website at
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/alerts/alt150.shtm.

We sincerely regret any inconvenience this may have caused you, and we want you to know that we are working with law enforcement authorities in every way we can to help in the investigation.  As always, we thank you for being a Michaels customer.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

John B. Menzer
CEO, Michaels Stores

 

Leave a comment