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Ten ways to advertise your website or blog that don’t cost money

Webmasters and bloggers are always looking for ways to advertise their sites and increase traffic. There are a lot of ways to do this that don’t cost a penny.
Here’s some of my suggestions in no particular order…

Produce good-quality content and have it indexed by the search engines

People want content, and content sells itself. If you’re searching for something, then come up with what you’re looking for, why not mention it with a link? Or, if you solve a problem with a piece of software, or find a bug, write about it. Certainly other people have run into the same thing, and they’re likely looking for the same thing you were. Help them find you.

This is actually a lot easier than most people realize — it only takes a few steps to set up, and the rest of the crawling is done by the search engines automatically. Don’t bother with sites that want you to pay to submit — you can do it yourself in a few minutes, and it doesn’t cost anything. Depending on your CMS software, you can likely find a plugin to help with generating and submitting your sitemap. Read more about it here.

Participate in forums and have your URL in your signature

An easy method if you’re already involved in one or more forums regularly. Simply edit your forum signature to include your site’s title and a URL. You can also do this with your email signature to hit the people you email as well.

Leave comments on other blogs and link back to your site

This is great when you can find a blog that’s related to yours, or has a post about a topic that’s related to something you’ve already written about. Simply post your thoughts on the issue, with a segue “I mentioned this at…” with a link. I have gotten a lot of traffic this way, though it relies heaving on the other blog having traffic, and catching people with your brief statement enough to make them want to click through. It can be done, and it works very well.

Link to other blogs from your own posts to generate “pingbacks.”

I’ve seen this done well, and I’ve seen it become spammy at the same time. When you link to another blog from one of your posts, (depending on the platform) the software will generate what’s called a “pingback“. This means it posts a link to your site at the site you linked to. It can be good to generate links to your site.

Post links to your new articles on social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.

Again, can be very effective, can also be very spammy if not done correctly. You’ve written a great interesting article that you want people to read. Post a link on your favorite social-networking site — Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter to name a few — and people are sure to click on it, right? Just make sure they’ll find the story as interesting as you did, and avoid over-posting, or you’ll lose followers faster than you can create new posts.

Submit your RSS feed to aggregation sites like Facebook, Digg, etc.

Facebook has a feature in Facebook Notes that allows you to submit an RSS feed that will publish your posts as Notes. The new Digg also has a feature that will allow you to submit an RSS feed to be automatically published on the site. Many other sites also support this, and it’s a great way to have your new articles automatically pushed out there. There is a downside to this: People will read the article on the published site and may not click through to your site. Try including links to other posts inside your own to get those click throughs.

Personally email out links to articles that others would find interesting.

Email marketing is great, and has a very high click-to-impression ratio. This means that, for every person that looks at your link, a lot of them will click on it to read it. Now, be careful with this one, and try not to get spammy. Opt-in mailing lists are great if you can get people to sign up, and you will have a very low likelihood of upsetting someone that doesn’t want to get your emails (or worse — having them report you as a spammer), but if you know you have an audience, shoot them an email, but make sure it’s personal.

Consider Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a set of copyright rules that, among other rights, can allow others to publish your content providing they provide credit in a manner of your choosing. This can include a link back to your site. Interested readers finding these articles can see your authorship on them and click through to your site to see whatever else they might be interested in.

Participate in Link Exchanges and Blogrolls

If you know someone who has a website or a blog, ask nicely if they’ll post a link to your site on theirs in exchange for the same on yours. A well-placed link on another site can generate traffic from an interested visitor, and the other site will no doubt appreciate the same from you.

 

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