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Archive for March 28th, 2010

Getting your Dell Service Tag number from the command line in Ubuntu Linux

The original post has been updated and reposted as

How to get your Dell service tag from the command line in Windows and Linux.

Please see the new post. Thank you.

 

 

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Automounting an additional internal hard drive at boot time in Ubuntu Linux

Mounting an extra internal hard drive typically requires manual effort by the superuser, but there is a way to configure it to be done (rather easily) at boot time through a handy utility called pysdm.

The first thing you want to do is install pysdm from either synaptic or the command line. The command-line way is:

sudo apt-get install pysdm

Now that pysdm is installed, you’ll find it under System > Administration > Storage Device Manager

Starting it, you’ll see your list of drives on the left pane. Select the drive and partition you want (this assumes you know how to do that already) and click Assistant.

In assistant choose at least The file system is mounted at boot time along with any other options you might want.

Apply and reboot to verify it’s working.

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How to : Configuring remote desktop in Ubuntu / Gnome

On the computer that will be sharing the desktop, go to System > Preferences > Remote Desktop

If you want others to just see your desktop, but not be able to make changes, enable Allow other users to view your desktop only. If they should be able to change settings (e.g. repair your system if there are problems), enable Allow other users to control your desktop as well.

If someone connects to your desktop and you want to be prompted to block or allow that connection, enable Ask you for confirmation. This makes sense only if someone is actually sitting in front of the system. If you want to connect to your office desktop or any other system that only you have access to, then don’t enable this option

However, with Ask you for confirmation off, what you certainly want to do is set a password for your remote desktop (without a password anyone who happens to find out your system’s address – e.g. by scanning the network – can access your desktop)

If you’re behind a router or firewall, you may need to allow or forward port 5900 to that computer.

Sourced from http://www.howtoforge.com/configure-remote-access-to-your-ubuntu-desktop March 28th 2010

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